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SUGERENCIAS PARA EVITAR CORRUPCIONES DE LA BASE DE DATOS
« : Diciembre 20, 2014, 12:09:58 pm »
Sugerencias para evitar Corrupciones de la Base de Datos

** Maintain rolling backups with proper ageing. For example, keep one a day for the last 7 days, then one a week for the last 4 weeks, then one a month for the rest of the year, then one a year.
** Use warm standby with log shipping and/or replication to maintain a live copy of the DB.
** If you want point-in-time recovery, keep a few days or weeks worth of WAL archives and a basebackup around. That'll help you recover from those "oops I meant DROP TABLE unimportant; not DROP TABLE vital_financial_records;" issues.
** Keep up to date with the latest PostgreSQL patch releases. Don't be one of those people still running 9.0.0 when 9.0.10 is out.
** Plug-pull test your system when you're testing it before going live. Put it under load with something like pgbench, then literally pull the plug out. If your database doesn't come back up fine you have hardware, OS or configuration problems.
** Don't `kill -9` the postmaster. It should be fine, but it's still not smart.
** ABSOLUTELY NEVER DELETE postmaster.pid
** Use good quality hardware with proper cooling and a good quality power supply. If possible, ECC RAM is a nice extra.
** Never, ever, ever use cheap SSDs. Use good quality hard drives or (after proper testing) high end SSDs. Read the SSD reviews periodically posted on this mailing list if considering using SSDs.
Make sure the SSD has a supercapacitor or other reliable option for flushing its write cache on power loss. Always do repeated plug-pull testing when using SSDs.
** Use a solid, reliable file system. zfs-on-linux, btrfs, etc are not the right choices for a database you care about. Never, ever, ever use FAT32.
** If on Windows, do not run an anti-virus program on your database server. Nobody should be using it for other things or running programs on it anyway.
** Avoid RAID 5, mostly because the performance is terrible, but also because I've seen corruption issues with rebuilds from parity on failing disks.
** Use a good quality hardware RAID controller with a battery backup cache unit if you're using spinning disks in RAID. This is as much for performance as reliability; a BBU will make an immense difference to database performance.
** If you're going to have a UPS (you shouldn't need one as your system should be crash-safe), don't waste your money on a cheap one. Get a good online double-conversion unit that does proper power filtering.
Cheap UPSs are just a battery with a fast switch, they provide no power filtering and what little surge protection they offer is done with a component that wears out after absorbing a few surges, becoming totally ineffective.
Since your system should be crash-safe a cheap UPS will do nothing for corruption protection, it'll only help with uptime.